Remembering Martin Luther King’s Last, Most Radical Book

by Peter Kolozi and James Freeman

1. Martin Luther King Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community (Beacon Press, 2010 [1967]).

2. Milton R. Konvitz, “Power for the Poor,” Saturday Review (July 8, 1967).

3. Eliot Fremont-Smith, “Storm Warnings,” New York Times (July 12, 1967).

4. Martin Duberman, “Review: Where Do We Go from Here,” Book Week (July 9, 1967).

5. Andrew Kopkind, “Review: Where Do We Go from Here,” New York Review of Books (August 24, 1967).

6. W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).

7. “The Story of King’s ‘Beyond Vietnam’ Speech,” NPR (March 30, 2010).

8. Cornel West, The Radical King (Beacon Press, 2015), xiii.

9. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 51.

10. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 76.

11. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 197.

12. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 71.

13. Martin Luther King Jr., Why We Can’t Wait (Signet Classics, 2000 [1963]), 36.

14. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 196-197.

15. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 198-199.

16. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 95.

17. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 5-6.

18. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 177.

19. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 53.

20. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 174.

21. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 51.

22. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 173.

23. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 170-175, 182, 196, 198-199.

24. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 8.

25. Robert L. Allen, Reluctant Reformers: Racism and Social Reform Movements in the United States (Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1975).

26. Intan Suwandi and John Bellamy Foster, “Multinational Corporations and the Globalization of Monopoly Capital: From the 1960s to the Present,” Monthly Review (July-August 2016), 114-131.

27. By the mid- to late 1960s union membership was already on its downward trajectory from its high point of 35 percent of the workforce in 1954. By 1965 the union membership rate was below 30 percent.

28. For instance, after adjusting for inflation the average hourly wage in 2014 had roughly the same purchasing power as it had in 1979, while most of the wage gains have gone to the top 90th percentile. See Drew Desilver, “For Most Workers, Real Wages Have Barely Budged for Decades,” Pew Research Center (October 9, 2014), www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/10/09/for-most-workers-real-wages-have-barely-budged-for-decades/; and in 2014, writes the New York Times, corporate profits are at their highest level since 1929 and employee compensation at its lowest level in 65 years. See Floyd Norris, “Corporate Profits Grow and Wages Slide,” New York Times (April 4, 2014); Drew Desilver, “Who’s Poor in America? 50 Years into the ‘War on Poverty’ a Data Portrait,” Pew Research Center (January 13, 2014).

29. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 190.

30. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 190.

31. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 197.

32. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 199.

33. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 73.

34. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 76.

35. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 79.

36. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 90.

37. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 173.

38. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 171-172.

39. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 172.

40. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 172.

41. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 92.

42. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 172.

43. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 172-173.

44. King, Where Do We Go from Here, 183.

45. Paul Le Blanc and Michael D. Yates, A Freedom Budget for All Americans: Recapturing the Promise of the Civil Rights Movement in the Struggle for Economic Justice (Monthly Review Press, 2013).

46. Loic Wacquant, “From Slavery to Mass Incarceration,” New Left Review (no. 13, Jan/Feb 2002), 41-60; Mike Davis, Planet of Slums (Verso, 2007).

47. King, Why We Can’t Wait, 55.